NEJM Catalyst
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Patient Behavior Change: Building Blocks for Success

April 4, 2018
1:00pm - 5:00pm EDT


Registration coming soon!



If only the patient would take the prescribed medication, eat nutritious foods, lose weight, quit smoking – the list is lengthy. Many health problems, including some chronic diseases, result from intractable human behavior. Rather than blame patient non-compliance, however, health care providers have come to recognize behavior change as a complex challenge that involves not just the patient, but also clinicians and communities.


Agenda

1:00 PM

Welcome and Introduction

1:05 PM

Opening Talk

1:20 PM

Session 1: Creating Behavior Change: How Clinicians Should Engage Patients

2:35 PM

Session 2: Scaling Behavior Change: Community-Based Strategies

3:50 PM

Session 3: Sustaining Behavior Change: Making It Effortless

4:50 PM

Closing Remarks


Speakers

Sara Bleich

Sara Bleich, PhD

Professor of Public Health Policy, Harvard Chan School of Public Health

Angela Fagerlin

Angela Fagerlin, PhD

Professor and Chair, Department of Population Health Sciences, University of Utah, Research Scientist, Salt Lake City VA Center for Informatics Decision Enhancement and Surveillance (IDEAS)

Gary Foster

Gary D. Foster, Ph.D.

Chief Scientific Officer, Weight Watchers International, Inc.

Thomas Lee

Thomas H. Lee, MD, MSc

Chief Medical Officer, Press Ganey Associates, Editorial Board, The New England Journal of Medicine; Leadership Board Founder, NEJM Catalyst

Namita Mohta

Namita S. Mohta, MD

Clinical Editor, NEJM Catalyst, Center for Healthcare Delivery Sciences, Brigham and Women's Hospital

Victor Montori

Victor M. Montori, MD

Professor of Medicine, Mayo Clinic

Eric Peterson

Eric D. Peterson, MD, MPH, FAHA, FACC

Executive Director, Duke Clinical Research Institute?Professor of Medicine, Cardiology?Fred Cobb, MD, Distinguished Professor of Medicine DCRI Executive Director , Duke University Medical Center

Kathryn Pollack

Kathryn I. Pollack, Ph.D.

Co-Leader, Cancer Control and Population Sciences Duke Cancer Institute, Duke School of Medicine

Roy Rosin

Roy Rosin, MBA

Chief Innovation Officer, Penn Medicine

Peter Ubel

Peter A. Ubel, MD

Madge and Dennis T. McLawhorn University Professor of Business, Public Policy, and Medicine, Duke University

Kevin Volpp

Kevin Volpp, MD, PhD

Director, Center for Health Incentives and Behavioral Economics, Leonard Davis Institute; Vice Chairman Health Policy, Department of Medical Ethics and Health Policy; Founders President’s Distinguished Professor, Perelman School of Medicine and the Wharton School,

Charlene Wong

Charlene Wong, MD MSHP

Department of Pediatrics, Duke Clinical Research Institute, Duke-Margolis Center for Health Policy, Duke University

1:00 PM

Welcome and Introduction


Namita S. Mohta, MD

Clinical Editor, NEJM Catalyst, Center for Healthcare Delivery Sciences, Brigham and Women's Hospital

Eric D. Peterson, MD, MPH, FAHA, FACC

Executive Director, Duke Clinical Research Institute?Professor of Medicine, Cardiology?Fred Cobb, MD, Distinguished Professor of Medicine DCRI Executive Director , Duke University Medical Center

1:05 PM

Opening Talk


Kevin Volpp, MD, PhD

Director, Center for Health Incentives and Behavioral Economics, Leonard Davis Institute; Vice Chairman Health Policy, Department of Medical Ethics and Health Policy; Founders President’s Distinguished Professor, Perelman School of Medicine and the Wharton School,

1:20 PM

Session 1: Creating Behavior Change: How Clinicians Should Engage Patients


Effective and meaningful communication between patients and clinicians is deceptively difficult, especially when patients are seen quickly and infrequently in health care settings. But there are key guiding principles for behavior change, such as clinicians not assuming they know how to incorporate patients’ values into medical decisions. This session features experts on shared decision-making, the communication of medical data, and provider-patient communication.


Angela Fagerlin, PhD

Professor and Chair, Department of Population Health Sciences, University of Utah, Research Scientist, Salt Lake City VA Center for Informatics Decision Enhancement and Surveillance (IDEAS)

Victor M. Montori, MD

Professor of Medicine, Mayo Clinic

Kathryn I. Pollack, Ph.D.

Co-Leader, Cancer Control and Population Sciences Duke Cancer Institute, Duke School of Medicine

2:35 PM

Session 2: Scaling Behavior Change: Community-Based Strategies


Research demonstrates the power of community-based interventions to influence behavior change, both at an individual and population level. These strategies span social networks to encourage healthy behavior and policy changes such as sugar taxes. But scaling up healthy behavior through communities is complex. Two expert researchers on obesity will discuss the successful application of community-based strategies, and their limits.


Sara Bleich, PhD

Professor of Public Health Policy, Harvard Chan School of Public Health

Gary D. Foster, Ph.D.

Chief Scientific Officer, Weight Watchers International, Inc.

Thomas H. Lee, MD, MSc

Chief Medical Officer, Press Ganey Associates, Editorial Board, The New England Journal of Medicine; Leadership Board Founder, NEJM Catalyst

3:50 PM

Session 3: Sustaining Behavior Change: Making It Effortless


Healthy behaviors can be realized through nudges, such as influencing patient or provider choices through incentives or default settings. But getting behavior change to stick is often a challenge; witness the difficulty of lasting weight loss. Some goals are inherently difficult. In this session, a physician/behavioral scientist and an innovation leader will talk about why and how different behavioral strategies work, and in what contexts.


Roy Rosin, MBA

Chief Innovation Officer, Penn Medicine

Peter A. Ubel, MD

Madge and Dennis T. McLawhorn University Professor of Business, Public Policy, and Medicine, Duke University

Charlene Wong, MD MSHP

Department of Pediatrics, Duke Clinical Research Institute, Duke-Margolis Center for Health Policy, Duke University

4:50 PM

Closing Remarks


Thomas H. Lee, MD, MSc

Chief Medical Officer, Press Ganey Associates, Editorial Board, The New England Journal of Medicine; Leadership Board Founder, NEJM Catalyst

Sara Bleich

Professor of Public Health Policy

Sara Bleich, PhD


Harvard Chan School of Public Health

Sara Bleich is a Professor of Public Health Policy at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health in the Department of Health Policy and Management.

Her research provides evidence to support policy alternatives for obesity prevention and control, particularly among populations at higher risk for obesity. A signature theme throughout her work is an interest in asking simple, meaningful questions about the complex problem of obesity which can fill important gaps in the literature.

Sara is the past recipient of an award for “most outstanding abstract” at the International Conference on Obesity in Sydney, Australia, an award for “best research manuscript” in the journal Obesity, and an award for excellence in public interest communication from the Frank Conference. Sara was recently appointed as a White House Fellow (2015-2016) where she was a Senior Policy Advisor to the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the First Lady’s Let’s Move initiative. She holds degrees from Columbia (BA, Psychology) and Harvard (PhD, Health Policy).

Angela Fagerlin

Professor and Chair, Department of Population Health Sciences, University of Utah

Angela Fagerlin, PhD


Research Scientist, Salt Lake City VA Center for Informatics Decision Enhancement and Surveillance (IDEAS)

Dr. Fagerlin is Chair and Professor in the Department of Population Health Sciences at the University of Utah Health and is a Research Scientist at Salt Lake City VA Center for Informatics Decision Enhancement and Surveillance (IDEAS). Her training is in experimental psychology, primarily in the areas of cognitive and social psychology.

Her research, which has been funded by VA, NCI, NIH, NSF, and the European Union, focuses on testing methods for communicating medical data to patients and providers, including the risks and benefits of treatment, as well as the development and testing of decision support interventions. Dr. Fagerlin's recent work examines the impact of patient decision aids on patient-physician communication and decision quality, and also tests multiple methods for communicating about genetic testing and infectious diseases.

Dr. Fagerlin has served on the FDA's Risk Communication Advisory Committee and is the current Past President of the Society of Medical Decision Making. She has been recognized as being among the top 1% of researchers with most cited papers in social sciences (2014) and as a champion of shared decision making (an honor bestowed by the Informed Medical Decisions Foundations to the 25 individuals who have provided inspiration and guidance in the field of shared decision making).

Gary Foster

Chief Scientific Officer

Gary D. Foster, Ph.D.


Weight Watchers International, Inc.

Gary Foster, Ph.D., is the Chief Scientific Officer at Weight Watchers
International, Inc. Foster, a psychologist, obesity investigator and behavior
change expert, was previously the Founder and Director of the Center of Obesity Research and Education and Laura Carnell Professor of Medicine, Public Health and Psychology at Temple University in Philadelphia. Prior to Temple, he served as the Clinical Director of the Weight and Eating Disorders Program at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine.

He has authored more than 180 scientific publications and three books on the etiology and treatment of obesity. Foster has received numerous honors including President of The Obesity Society, Honorary Member of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, Outstanding Contributions to Health Psychology from the American Psychological Association, and the George A. Bray Founders Award from The Obesity Society.

Dr. Foster's research interests include the prevention, behavioral determinants, treatments, and effects of obesity in adults and children. His current focus is on scalable, evidence-based approaches to obesity management. Foster earned his Bachelor of Arts degree in Psychology from Duquesne University, an M.S. in Psychology from University of Pennsylvania, and a Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from Temple University.

Thomas Lee

Chief Medical Officer, Press Ganey Associates, Editorial Board, The New England Journal of Medicine; Leadership Board Founder

Thomas H. Lee, MD, MSc


NEJM Catalyst

Dr. Thomas Lee is Chief Medical Officer of Press Ganey, and an internist and cardiologist, who practices at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston. He is a Professor of Medicine, part time, at Harvard Medical School and Professor of Health Policy and Management at the Harvard School of Public Health.

Prior to joining Press Ganey, he served as Network President for Partners Healthcare System and CEO for Partners Community HealthCare, Inc., the integrated delivery system founded by Brigham and Women's Hospital and Massachusetts General Hospital.
He is a member of the Board of Directors of Geisinger Health System, and chairman of the Board of Directors for Geisinger Health Plan. He is also a member of the Board of Directors of Health Leads; the Board of Overseers of Weill Cornell Medical College; the Special Medical Advisory Group (SMAG) of the Veterans Administration; and the Panel of Health Advisors of the Congressional Budget Office. He is a member of the Editorial Board of The New England Journal of Medicine.

He is the author of more than 260 academic articles and three books, Chaos and Organization in Health Care, Eugene Braunwald and the Rise of Modern Medicine, and An Epidemic of Empathy in Healthcare.
Named in his honor, the Thomas H. Lee Award for Excellence in Primary Care is given each year to recognize a primary care physician at Brigham and Women's Hospital who meets the needs of his or her patients exceptionally well.

Tom holds a bachelor's degree in history and science from Harvard College, a medical degree from Cornell University Medical College and a master's degree in epidemiology from the Harvard School of Public Health. He lives in Milton, Mass., with his wife, Dr. Soheyla Gharib, who is Chief of Medicine at Harvard University Health Services. The couple has three daughters.

Namita Mohta

Clinical Editor, NEJM Catalyst

Namita S. Mohta, MD


Center for Healthcare Delivery Sciences, Brigham and Women's Hospital

Namita Seth Mohta, MD is the Clinical Editor for NEJM Catalyst, a new venture launched by the New England Journal of Medicine/NEJM Group to advance the dialogue amongst leaders to drive innovations in health care delivery. As a key member of the leadership team, she has responsibility for editorial strategy and content quality. Dr. Mohta is the Clinical Lead for the ACO at The New England Quality Care Alliance Physicians Organization affiliated with Tufts Medical Center. She works with the network to define strategy, implement system-wide clinical initiatives, and develop analytic tools to successfully improve outcomes.

Prior to these roles, Dr. Mohta served as the Medical Director for Population Health Management at Partners Health Care. There she was a part of the initial leadership team responsible for the development and implementation of innovative, Partners-wide programs to successfully improve quality of care, and lower costs for the populations they served under alternative payment contracts such as the Medicare Pioneer Accountable Care Organization. Her responsibilities included implementation of Partners' primary care strategy to evolve practices towards Patient-Centered Medical Homes as well as the care management program for their most medically complex, high risk patients. Dr. Mohta was the clinical lead for Partners' strategy to improve care for the often vulnerable, Medicaid population. Prior to this role, Dr. Mohta was Clinical Director of Partners Business Planning, responsible for system-level, clinical strategy projects. She also has industry experience as a management consultant with the Boston Consulting Group.

Dr. Mohta practices as a Hospitalist at the Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) in Boston, MA and attends on the academic teaching service. Her clinical interests include improving end-of-life care in the inpatient setting. Academically, she is faculty at the Center for Healthcare Delivery Sciences at BWH and at Harvard Medical School. She completed her Internal Medicine and Primary Care residency training at the Brigham and Women's Hospital. Dr. Mohta is a graduate of Yale College and Yale School of Medicine.

Victor Montori

Professor of Medicine

Victor M. Montori, MD


Mayo Clinic

Victor M. Montori, MD is a Professor of Medicine at Mayo Clinic. An endocrinologist and health services researcher, Dr. Montori is the author of more than 590 peer-reviewed publications and is among the top 1% of researchers with most cited papers in clinical medicine worldwide in the last decade.

He is now a Senior Advisor of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. He also serves in the Editorial Advisory Board for the BMJ, the board of AcademyHealth, and as Director of Late Stage Translational Research at the Mayo Center for Clinical and Translational Science. He is a recognized expert in evidence-based medicine and shared decision making, and developer of the concept of minimally disruptive medicine. He works in Rochester, Minnesota, at Mayo Clinic's KER Unit, to advance person-centered care for patients with diabetes and other chronic conditions.

He is a founder of The Patient Revolution, a nonprofit focused on promoting careful and kind patient care, and author of the book Why We Revolt - a patient revolution for careful and kind care.

Eric Peterson

Executive Director, Duke Clinical Research Institute?Professor of Medicine, Cardiology?Fred Cobb, MD, Distinguished Professor of Medicine DCRI Executive Director

Eric D. Peterson, MD, MPH, FAHA, FACC


Duke University Medical Center

Dr. Peterson is a Professor of Medicine in the Division of Cardiology at Duke University Medical Center. Dr. Peterson served as Vice Chair for Quality in the Department of Medicine from 2004–2010. His formal research training includes an MPH from Harvard University with special emphasis in biostatistics, health economics, and decision analysis. Dr. Peterson is a leader in quality research, with over 600 peer-reviewed publications in the field.

Dr. Peterson is the principal investigator (PI) for the NIH/AHRQ Duke Centers for Education and Research on Therapeutics (CERTs), Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) National Cardiac Surgery Database, Data Coordinating Center for both the American College of Cardiology’s National Cardiac Database (ACC-NCDR), and the American Heart Association’s Get With the Guidelines Data (AHA GWTG). He is the PI and Center Director for the American Heart Association’s Pharmaceutical Roundtable Outcomes Center (one of four nationwide) as well as Director of the Coordinating Center for the NHLBI’s Centers for Cardiovascular Outcomes Research.

For the past 20 years, Dr. Peterson has mentored more than 20 fellows, thus helping to create the next generation of physician scientists.

Dr. Peterson participates on multiple national committees, including Chair of the AHA Quality of Care and Outcomes Research Interdisciplinary Working Group; Chair of the AHA Strategic Planning Committee, ACC/AHA Performance Measures Task Force; ACCF Appropriateness Criteria Implementation Working Group; the VA’s Quality Enhancement Research Initiative (QUERI) Executive Committee; Oversight Board of the Massachusetts Data Analysis Center (MASS-DAC); the National Quality Forum Technical Advisory Panel for Priorities, Goals and a Measurement Framework: Efficiency and Episodes of Care; the Institute of Medicine (IOM) Committee on Redesigning Insurance Benefits, Provider Payments and Accountability Programs to Promote Quality of Health Care Delivery; the IOM Committee on Secondhand Smoke Exposure and Acute Coronary Events; and Co-Chair of the National Quality Forum Outpatient Imaging Efficiency Project Steering Committee. Dr. Peterson is also a member of the American Society for Clinical Investigation (ASCI) Council. He received the Duke Med Scholar Award in 2007. In 2010, he was awarded the Fred Cobb MD Distinguished Professor of Medicine. He is also a contributing editor on the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Kathryn Pollack

Co-Leader, Cancer Control and Population Sciences Duke Cancer Institute

Kathryn I. Pollack, Ph.D.


Duke School of Medicine

Dr. Pollak is a social psychologist and Professor in Population Health Sciences. She also is the Co-Leader of Cancer Control and Population Sciences one of the eight programs in the Duke Cancer Institute. She has been developing behavioral interventions for 19 years, mostly to promote smoking cessation, increase exercise, and improve nutrition with many populations, including cancer survivors. She has studied clinician-patient communication for the past 13 years and serves as a Communication Coach in which she teaches clinicians directly for the past 5 years.

Roy Rosin

Chief Innovation Officer

Roy Rosin, MBA


Penn Medicine

Roy Rosin is Chief Innovation Officer at Penn Medicine, working to rapidly design, test, and implement high-impact health care delivery practices. His team reimagines interventions to achieve dramatically improved patient outcomes, experience, and high-value care. In the past 5 years they have driven measurable progress in readmission rates, medication adherence, screening rates, guiding patients to optimal care settings, and hypertension management, among other breakthroughs.

Previously, Roy served as the first VP of Innovation for Intuit, a leading software company best known for Quicken and TurboTax. In this role, he led changes in how Intuit managed new business creation, allowing teams to experiment quickly at low cost. After 5 years of redesigning practices, the company delivered shareholder returns 33 times the S&P 500. Intuit now consistently appears on Forbes' list of the most innovative companies in the world.

Prior to leading innovation, Roy's Quicken team achieved record profitability and product leadership while growing to 14 million consumers. Roy's 18 years with Intuit spanned the early years in software to their emergence as a leading SaaS provider.

Outside of his Penn role, Roy advises start-ups and Fortune 100 companies building new technology businesses focused on making a meaningful difference in people's lives.

Roy received his MBA from Stanford and graduated with honors from Harvard College.

Peter Ubel

Madge and Dennis T. McLawhorn University Professor of Business, Public Policy, and Medicine

Peter A. Ubel, MD


Duke University

Peter A. Ubel, MD, is a physician and behavioral scientist whose research and writing explores how people make decisions related to health and health care. He is the Madge and Dennis T. McLawhorn University Professor of Business, Public Policy, and Medicine at Duke University.

He uses the tools of decision psychology and behavioral economics to explore topics like informed consent, shared decision-making, and health care cost containment. He has authored over 250 academic publications, the majority of which involve empirical explorations of decision psychology as it pertains to health care.

He has written for the New York Times, Los Angeles Times, The Atlantic, and New Yorker, and is a regular contributor at Forbes. His books include Pricing Life (MIT Press, 2000), Free Market Madness (Harvard Business Press, 2009), and Critical Decisions (HarperCollins, 2012). You can find his blogs and other information at http://www.peterubel.com/.

Kevin Volpp

Director

Kevin Volpp, MD, PhD


Center for Health Incentives and Behavioral Economics, Leonard Davis Institute; Vice Chairman Health Policy, Department of Medical Ethics and Health Policy; Founders President’s Distinguished Professor, Perelman School of Medicine and the Wharton School,

Dr. Volpp is the founding Director of the Center for Health Incentives and Behavioral Economics, Division Chief of Health Policy for the Department of Medical Ethics and Policy, and the Founders President's Distinguished Professor of Medicine at the Perelman School of Medicine and Health Care Management at the Wharton School of the university of Pennsylvania. He is a board certified practicing physician at the Philadelphia VA Medical Center.
Dr. Volpp's work focuses on developing and testing innovative ways of applying insights from behavioral economics in improving patient health behavior and affecting provider performance. He has led projects with a variety of employers, insurers, health systems, and consumer companies in testing the impact of different behavioral economic strategies on behavior. He has competitively been awarded more than $60 million to lead or co-lead studies funded by the NIH; the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation; the CDC; VA Health Services Research and Development; Robert Wood Johnson Foundation; the Hewlett Foundation; the Commonwealth Foundation; the Aetna Foundation; Mckinsey; CVS Caremark; Horizon Blue Cross Blue Shield; Hawaii Medical Services Association; Merck; Humana; Aramark; Weight Watchers; and Discovery (South Africa).

Dr. Volpp has published more than 200 articles, book chapters, and commentaries, and his work has been covered by media outlets worldwide. His work has served as the foundation for numerous widely implemented programs such as benefit design initiatives using financial incentives for smoking cessation among GE and CVS employees, a prescription refill synchronization program for Humana members, a simple health insurance plan called "Humana Simplicity", and an approach to increase medication refills using enhanced active choice among CVS members.

Dr. Volpp's work has been recognized by a number of awards including the Matilda White Riley Award for career achievement by the Office of Social and Behavioral Science at NIH and the Association for Clinical and Translational Science Distinguished Investigator Award for Clinical and Translational Science. Volpp is an elected member of the American Society of Clinical Investigation (ASCI), the Association of American Physicians (AAP), and the National Academy of Medicine (formerly the Institute of Medicine) of the National Academy of Sciences (IOM). He has served as an advisor to many different health plans, employers, and consumer companies and is a principal of the behavioral economic consulting firm VALHealth.

Charlene Wong

Department of Pediatrics, Duke Clinical Research Institute, Duke-Margolis Center for Health Policy

Charlene Wong, MD MSHP


Duke University

Dr. Wong is an adolescent medicine pediatrician and health services researcher. Her clinical and research expertise is in working with adolescents and young adults to improve their health and well-being. She studies health-related behavior change, leveraging principles from behavioral economics, employing youth- and person-centered research methodologies, and informing health policy. Her work has been published in high impact journals (e.g., New England Journal of Medicine, Health Affairs, JAMA Pediatrics) and covered by top media outlets (e.g., New York Times, NPR, Kaiser Health News).

She is an assistant professor at Duke University in the Department of Pediatrics, Duke Clinical Research Institute (DCRI), and Duke-Margolis Center for Health Policy. She directs health behaviors and needs research in the Duke Children's Health Discovery Institute. She is also a faculty member in the Duke Center for Childhood Obesity Research.

Dr. Wong received her undergraduate degree at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill as a Morehead-Cain scholar and her MD degree at Emory University as a Robert Woodruff Memorial scholar. She completed her pediatrics residency at the University of Washington and Seattle Children's Hospital. Prior to joining Duke, she was at the University of Pennsylvania and Children's Hospital of Philadelphia for an adolescent medicine and Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Clinical Scholars Fellowships.