NEJM Catalyst
Upcoming Webcast

Care Delivery Innovation: Why, How, and the Impact

October 16, 2019
1:00pm - 5:00pm CDT


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Innovation is a constant goal in health care today. But the path to more effective, less expensive, more satisfying care goes beyond the latest smartphone apps. True innovation reimagines all the ways that health care is delivered.


Agenda

1:00 PM

Welcome

1:05 PM

Opening Talk: S. Claiborne Johnston, MD, PhD

1:20 PM

Why Innovate Now?

2:40 PM

Lessons from Primary and Specialty Care

3:55 PM

Innovation's Impact: Better Health

4:55 PM

Closing Remarks


Speakers

Khavita Bhavan

Khavita P. Bhavan, MD, MHS, FIDSA

Associate Vice Chair of High Value Care and Innovation, Department of Internal Medicine, UT Southwestern Medical Center; Chief Innovation Officer, Parkland Hospital and Health System

Asaf Bitton

Asaf Bitton, MD, MPH

Executive Director of Ariadne Labs, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health; Assistant Professor of Medicine and Health Care Policy, Harvard Medical School

Kevin Bozic

Kevin J. Bozic, MD, MBA

Chair of Surgery and Perioperative Care, Dell Medical School, The University of Texas at Austin

Stacey Chang

Stacey Chang, MS

Executive Director, Design Institute for Health, The University of Texas at Austin

Gordon Chen

Gordon Chen, MD

Chief Medical Officer, ChenMed

Alice Chen

Alice Hm Chen, MD, MPH

Chief Medical Officer and Deputy Director, San Francisco Health Network; Professor of Medicine, The University of California, San Francisco

S. Claiborne Johnston

S. Claiborne Johnston, MD, PhD

Dean, Vice President for Medical Affairs, Frank and Charmaine Denius Distinguished Dean’s Chair, Dell Medical School, The University of Texas at Austin

Margaret Laws

Margaret Laws, MPP

President and Chief Executive Officer, HopeLab

Thomas Lee

Thomas H. Lee, MD, MSc

Leadership Board Founder, NEJM Catalyst; Editorial Board, the New England Journal of Medicine; Chief Medical Officer, Press Ganey Associates

Namita Mohta

Namita Seth Mohta, MD

Clinical Editor, NEJM Catalyst; Center for Healthcare Delivery Sciences, Brigham and Women's Hospital

1:00 PM

Welcome


Namita Seth Mohta, MD

Clinical Editor, NEJM Catalyst; Center for Healthcare Delivery Sciences, Brigham and Women's Hospital

1:05 PM

Opening Talk: S. Claiborne Johnston, MD, PhD


Health care delivery requires a reframing. Ongoing innovation, far more than a technological silver bullet, is needed to create a system of health rather than sick care and improve the effectiveness of care delivery.


S. Claiborne Johnston, MD, PhD

Dean, Vice President for Medical Affairs, Frank and Charmaine Denius Distinguished Dean’s Chair, Dell Medical School, The University of Texas at Austin

1:20 PM

Why Innovate Now?


A structured discipline of innovation can be used to transform health care delivery. A researcher on improving the performance of care delivery and the head of a social innovation lab will talk about the necessity of expanding the scope of health care.


Asaf Bitton, MD, MPH

Executive Director of Ariadne Labs, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health; Assistant Professor of Medicine and Health Care Policy, Harvard Medical School

Stacey Chang, MS (Moderator)

Executive Director, Design Institute for Health, The University of Texas at Austin

Margaret Laws, MPP

President and Chief Executive Officer, HopeLab

2:40 PM

Lessons from Primary and Specialty Care


Innovative health care organizations have already learned how to deliver care in different ways with better outcomes. Hear from the leader of an organization seeking to revolutionize primary care, and another that involves patients in their own specialty care.


Khavita P. Bhavan, MD, MHS, FIDSA

Associate Vice Chair of High Value Care and Innovation, Department of Internal Medicine, UT Southwestern Medical Center; Chief Innovation Officer, Parkland Hospital and Health System

Gordon Chen, MD

Chief Medical Officer, ChenMed

Thomas H. Lee, MD, MSc (Moderator)

Leadership Board Founder, NEJM Catalyst; Editorial Board, the New England Journal of Medicine; Chief Medical Officer, Press Ganey Associates

3:55 PM

Innovation's Impact: Better Health


Health care needs deep change – away from fee-for-service and toward value. Leaders with experience in academic medicine and the public sector will discuss how to transform care delivery on a large scale for a more effective, efficient, and equitable system.


Kevin J. Bozic, MD, MBA

Chair of Surgery and Perioperative Care, Dell Medical School, The University of Texas at Austin

Alice Hm Chen, MD, MPH

Chief Medical Officer and Deputy Director, San Francisco Health Network; Professor of Medicine, The University of California, San Francisco

Namita Seth Mohta, MD (Moderator)

Clinical Editor, NEJM Catalyst; Center for Healthcare Delivery Sciences, Brigham and Women's Hospital

4:55 PM

Closing Remarks


Namita Seth Mohta, MD

Clinical Editor, NEJM Catalyst; Center for Healthcare Delivery Sciences, Brigham and Women's Hospital

Khavita Bhavan

Associate Vice Chair of High Value Care and Innovation, Department of Internal Medicine, UT Southwestern Medical Center

Khavita P. Bhavan, MD, MHS, FIDSA


Chief Innovation Officer, Parkland Hospital and Health System

Kavita P. Bhavan, MD, MHS, holds the titles of Associate Vice Chair of Innovation and High-Value Care in the Department of Internal Medicine, UT Southwestern Medical Center and Associate Professor Infectious Diseases and Chief Innovation Officer for Parkland Health & Hospital System. In addition, she serves as the Medical Director for the Outpatient Parenteral Antimicrobial Therapy Clinic and Infectious Diseases Ambulatory Clinics, Parkland Health & Hospital System, Dallas, Texas.

Dr. Bhavan’s research interests include reducing health disparities with a low-tech/low-cost patient-centered approach to clinical innovation, patient engagement, and “self-care models.”

Dr. Bhavan developed a self-care program for uninsured patients discharged from Parkland hospital’s safety-net setting to self-administer outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (S-OPAT) for the treatment of a variety of infections. While many insured patients in the United States are discharged into traditional OPAT settings, including visiting home health service, infusion center, or nursing home, uninsured patients often remain in the hospital to complete treatment. In the S-OPAT model, patients from a low-literacy/low–socioeconomic status population are taught to self-administer their IV antibiotics by gravity or IV push at home.

Published data for the S-OPAT program includes clinical outcomes showing a 47% reduction in 30-day readmissions for uninsured patients compared to patients receiving standard forms of OPAT. The first 4 years of the program resulted in >27,000 hospital bed days and approximately $40 million in savings. More than 3,500 patients have been treated for complicated infections through this program. Current research efforts include studying the collateral benefits of patient engagement in the S-OPAT program on chronic disease states and exploring other clinical settings for self-care models.

Asaf Bitton

Executive Director of Ariadne Labs, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

Asaf Bitton, MD, MPH


Assistant Professor of Medicine and Health Care Policy, Harvard Medical School

Asaf Bitton, MD, MPH, is Executive Director of Ariadne Labs and a global expert on primary care policy and delivery. He previously served as Director of Ariadne Labs’ Primary Health Care Program. He is a core founder of the Primary Health Care Performance Initiative, a partnership that includes the World Bank, the World Health Organization, and Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation dedicated to transforming the global state of primary health care.

In his research, Dr. Bitton has examined the rapid rise of chronic diseases throughout Polynesia, implemented global public health treaties to reduce the burden of tobacco use, and improved the measurement and delivery of primary care in Ghana, Costa Rica, and Estonia. A nationally recognized expert on U.S. health policy, he also serves as a Senior Advisor for Primary Care Policy at the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation. In this role since 2012, he has helped design and test three major comprehensive primary care payment and delivery initiatives, now active in 26 states and 3,000 practices that serve more than 3 million Medicare beneficiaries.

Dr. Bitton practices primary care at Brigham and Women’s South Huntington clinic, a team-based primary care practice in Boston that he helped found nearly 10 years ago. He is an Assistant Professor of Medicine and Health Care Policy at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School. He holds an undergraduate degree from Brown University and a medical degree from the University of California, San Francisco. He completed his residency and chief residency at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and has a master’s degree in Public Health from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

Kevin Bozic

Chair of Surgery and Perioperative Care, Dell Medical School

Kevin J. Bozic, MD, MBA


The University of Texas at Austin

Dr. Bozic is the inaugural Chair of Surgery and Perioperative Care at the Dell Medical School at UT Austin. He is a nationally recognized leader in orthopaedic surgery and value-based health care payment and delivery models. Prior to joining the Dell Medical School, he was the William R. Murray Endowed Professor and Vice Chair of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) School of Medicine, and Core Faculty of the Philip R. Lee Institute for Health Policy Studies. He holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Biomedical Engineering from Duke University, where he graduated magna cum laude, and an MD with Thesis degree from UCSF. He completed his Orthopaedic Surgery Residency training in the Harvard Combined Orthopaedic Residency Program, and additional Fellowship training in Adult Reconstructive Surgery from Rush University Medical Center in Chicago. Dr. Bozic also holds a Master of Business Administration from Harvard Business School (HBS), where he continues to serve as a Senior Institute Associate in Professor Michael Porter’s Institute for Strategy and Competitiveness.

Dr. Bozic’s clinical practice is focused on the management of patients with hip and knee arthritis, which he does in collaboration with a multidisciplinary team of providers focused on improving health outcomes that matter to their patients, including pain, function, and quality of life. He has over 15 years of experience as an Adult Reconstructive Surgeon focusing on simple and complex primary and revision hip and knee arthroplasty.

Dr. Bozic has extensive research and policy experience in the growing field of value-based health care, focused on implementation and evaluation of value-based payment and delivery models. Dr. Bozic is also actively involved in numerous regional and national health policy initiatives, including Chair of the American Joint Replacement Registry Steering Committee; the Yale Center for Outcomes Research & Evaluation (CORE) Performance Measurement Group; the Institute for Healthcare Improvement; and the Joint Commission Technical Advisory Panel. He is the co-founder and former Chair of the California Joint Replacement Registry, past Chair of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Council on Research and Quality, and a former member of the Agency for Health Care Research & Quality Effective Health Care Stakeholder Group.

Dr. Bozic has been the recipient of numerous awards, including the UCSF Exceptional Physician of the Year Award; the Orthopaedic Research & Education Foundation Clinical Research Award; the American Bone & Joint Surgeons Marshall Urist Young Investigator Award; the American Association of Hip & Knee Surgeons James A Rand Young Investigator Award and Lawrence D. Dorr Award; the American Orthopaedic Association American-British Exchange Fellowship; the Orthopaedic Research Society William Harris Award; and the Hip Society John Charnley Award, among others.

Stacey Chang

Executive Director, Design Institute for Health

Stacey Chang, MS


The University of Texas at Austin

Stacey Chang serves as the Executive Director of the Design Institute for Health at the University of Texas at Austin. It is a first-of-its-kind institution, dedicated to applying design approaches to solving systemic health care challenges as an integrated part of an operating health system and a medical education and training program.??Working with invested stakeholders in the health ecosystem, and harnessing the resources of the university, the Institute is focused on creating human-centered solutions in clinical and community environments — all with the intent to improve people’s health outcomes and health care experiences. The Design Institute considers topics as broad as the design of health products and services, the built environment, and the structure and functionality of the health ecosystem itself, and is committed to sharing advances that define a new model for societal health.??Until 2014, Stacey served as the Managing Director of the health care practice at IDEO, the global design and innovation firm. Clients included governments, research institutions, hospitals, pharma, insurance, med tech, and all the upstarts trying to rewrite the script, in both established and emerging markets.

Gordon Chen

Chief Medical Officer

Gordon Chen, MD


ChenMed

Physician. Advocate. Business and Thought Leader. Gordon Chen, MD, plays multiple roles in the privately held, family-run company that is transforming health care for the neediest populations.

As Chief Medical Officer of ChenMed, the growing, physician-led, full-risk medical practice, Dr. Chen empowers the company’s clinicians to deliver affordable care, a superior experience, and better health outcomes to seniors across the United States. A passionate advocate for preventive care, he leads the organization’s clinical efforts — including training, quality, physician culture, and medical costs — and oversees the success of the company clinical leaders and PCP partners.

Since formally joining ChenMed in 2011, Dr. Chen has helped the organization expand from six medical centers to more than 60 centers. He has hired and trained over 250 providers in ChenMed’s unique value-based health care delivery system and oversees the care of approximately 1,000–3,000 full-risk Medicare Advantage patients per center.
 
Dr. Chen has an Economics degree from Brown University. Following in his father’s and brother’s footsteps, Dr. Chen accepted a scholarship to attend the University of Miami School of Medicine for his Internal Medicine and Cardiology training. He is board certified in Internal Medicine, Cardiovascular Disease, and Echocardiography.
 
Dr. Chen is also President of Nicaragua Medical Missions, a Christian nonprofit organization that strives to create medical missions opportunities to meet the needs of multiple underserved Nicaraguan communities. Dr. Chen is married to his medical school sweetheart, Dr. Jessica Chen, and they have four children.

Alice Chen

Chief Medical Officer and Deputy Director, San Francisco Health Network

Alice Hm Chen, MD, MPH


Professor of Medicine, The University of California, San Francisco

Dr. Alice Chen is the Chief Medical Officer and Deputy Director for the San Francisco Health Network (SFHN), and Professor of Medicine at the University of California San Francisco (UCSF).

She has dedicated her career to promoting health equity through direct patient care, teaching, policy and advocacy, and administrative leadership across a variety of settings, including public health, philanthropy, academia, and government. Proficient in Mandarin and Spanish, she maintains an active clinical practice in both primary care and inpatient internal medicine.

In her role at SFHN, Dr. Chen is responsible for providing clinical and operational leadership, vision, and direction for the San Francisco Department of Public Health’s ~$2 billion a year publicly funded delivery system that encompasses primary, specialty, mental health, substance use, acute care, trauma, long-term, jail health, and homeless health care services. She has led the Network’s work responding to value-based payments, addressing patient-level social determinants of health, and creating an integrated system of care.

Known for her work with vulnerable populations and delivery system innovations to improve access and quality of care for safety-net systems, Dr. Chen has published over 50 book chapters, research, and peer-reviewed articles, including in the New England Journal of Medicine and Health Affairs. She has served on the board of several nonprofits and foundations, and currently serves as Board President for Health Access Foundation and The Health Initiative. In 2019, she was elected to the Harvard University Board of Overseers.

A graduate of Yale University, Stanford University Medical School, and the Harvard School of Public Health, Dr. Chen’s training includes a primary care internal medicine residency and chief residency at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. She is an alumna of the Commonwealth Fund Harvard University Fellowship in Minority Health Policy and the Aspen Institute’s Health Innovators Fellowship.

S. Claiborne Johnston

Dean, Vice President for Medical Affairs, Frank and Charmaine Denius Distinguished Dean’s Chair, Dell Medical School

S. Claiborne Johnston, MD, PhD


The University of Texas at Austin

Since March 2014, Dr. Clay Johnston has served as the inaugural Dean of Dell Medical School and Vice President for Medical Affairs at The University of Texas at Austin. His vision is to create a new model for academic medicine that accelerates innovation to improve health and reduce inefficiencies in health care. That includes building a vital, inclusive health ecosystem to support new and innovative models of education, care, research, and community impact — all with a focus on improving health locally as a model for accelerating change nationally. He is also a neurologist, specializing in stroke care and research.

Previously, Dr. Johnston was Associate Vice Chancellor for Research at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). He also directed the Clinical and Translational Science Institute and founded the UCSF Center for Healthcare Value to engage faculty and trainees in improving the quality of care while also lowering costs.

He is a graduate of Amherst College and Harvard Medical School. He later received a PhD in Epidemiology from the University of California, Berkeley, and was a resident in Neurology at UCSF, where he later trained in Vascular Neurology. During his 20 years at UCSF, he rose up the academic ranks to Professor of Neurology and Epidemiology and directed the Stroke Service.
Clay has authored more than 300 publications in scientific journals and has won several national awards for his research and teaching. In particular, he has published extensively in the prevention and treatment of stroke and transient ischemic attack. He is perhaps best known for his studies describing the short-term risk of stroke in patients with transient ischemic attack and identifying patients at greatest risk, and also for his work related to measuring the impact of research. He has led several large cohort studies of cerebrovascular disease and three international multicenter randomized trials, two of which are ongoing.

Margaret Laws

President and Chief Executive Officer

Margaret Laws, MPP


HopeLab

Margaret Laws is President and CEO of HopeLab, where she leads a multidisciplinary team combining behavioral science, user-centered design, and partnership with innovators to create technology products to help improve health and well-being for teens and young adults.

Prior to HopeLab, Margaret spent 17 years at the California HealthCare Foundation in a number of roles, including Director of Public Financing and Policy and Director of the Innovations for the Underserved program. She founded the CHCF Health Innovation Fund, a mission-focused fund investing in health care technology and service companies that improve access to and lower costs of health care.

Margaret holds a Master in Public Policy from Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government and an AB in English Literature from Princeton University. Margaret is a lecturer at the Stanford Graduate School of Business. She serves on the boards of Health Leads and Project Glimmer and is an adviser to Acumen America, United States of Care, ConsejoSano, and a number of early stage health care services and technology companies.

Thomas Lee

Leadership Board Founder, NEJM Catalyst; Editorial Board, the New England Journal of Medicine

Thomas H. Lee, MD, MSc


Chief Medical Officer, Press Ganey Associates

Dr. Thomas Lee is Chief Medical Officer of Press Ganey, and an internist and cardiologist who practices at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston. He is a Professor of Medicine, part time, at Harvard Medical School and Professor of Health Policy and Management at the Harvard School of Public Health. Prior to joining Press Ganey, he served as Network President for Partners Healthcare System and CEO for Partners Community HealthCare, Inc., the integrated delivery system founded by Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Massachusetts General Hospital.

He is a member of the Board of Directors of Geisinger Health System, Chairman of the Board of Directors for the Geisinger Health Plan, Geisinger Quality Options, Inc., and Geisinger Indemnity Insurance Company Board of Directors. He is also a member of the Board of Directors of Health Leads; the Board of Overseers of Weill Cornell Medical College; the Special Medical Advisory Group (SMAG) of the Veterans Administration; and the Panel of Health Advisors of the Congressional Budget Office. He is a member of the Editorial Board of The New England Journal of Medicine.

He is the author of more than 260 academic articles and three books, Chaos and Organization in Health Care, Eugene Braunwald and the Rise of Modern Medicine, and An Epidemic of Empathy in Healthcare.
Named in his honor, the Thomas H. Lee Award for Excellence in Primary Care is given each year to recognize a primary care physician at Brigham and Women’s Hospital who meets the needs of his or her patients exceptionally well.
Tom holds a bachelor’s degree in History and Science from Harvard College, a medical degree from Cornell University Medical College, and a master’s degree in Epidemiology from the Harvard School of Public Health. He lives in Milton, Massachusetts, with his wife, Dr. Soheyla Gharib, who is Chief of Medicine at Harvard University Health Services. The couple has three daughters.

Namita Mohta

Clinical Editor, NEJM Catalyst

Namita Seth Mohta, MD


Center for Healthcare Delivery Sciences, Brigham and Women's Hospital

Namita Seth Mohta, MD, is a physician executive with expertise in health care delivery transformation. As the Clinical Editor for NEJM Catalyst, she is part of the founding leadership team and has responsibility for content strategy and quality. She has been part of the founding Population Health and ACO leadership teams at both Partners Health Care and the New England Quality Care Alliance (Tufts Medical Center), both in Boston. Her responsibilities have included designing and implementing ACO strategies for Medicare, Medicaid, and commercial populations, with a focus on scaling tailored clinical interventions, integrating analytics and measurement, and leading change management and team-based care with providers. Dr. Mohta also has industry experience as a management consultant with the Boston Consulting Group. She often consults with start-ups (currently with PatientPing, GNS Healthcare, and Day Health Strategies) to provide strategic and technical expertise and leadership. Dr. Mohta practices internal medicine at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital and is faculty at The Center for Healthcare Delivery Sciences at Harvard Medical School. She completed her Internal Medicine and Primary Care residency training at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital. Dr. Mohta is a graduate of Yale College and Yale School of Medicine.